Posted in Farm

2016 Apprenticeship Program

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Jason and I are looking for someone to apprentice with us for the 2016 growing season. The apprenticeship will start end of March-early April and go until mid-November. The apprenticeship, as we like to think of it, is much less a job and much more an experience of being an integral part of our farm. We only take on one apprentice at a time, so you would be working closely with us on a daily basis. Our aim is to provide an educational experience that teaches the ins and outs of our style of farming and gives our apprentice the tools to continue farming after they have left our farm. You would also be a part of our community which gets together often for potlucks and other communal activities.

Vegetable farming/gardening experience is helpful but not necessary. Must be physically fit and willing to do hard physical labor. Construction experience is a bonus. Open-mindeness, flexibility and a sense of humor are also attributes that will serve you well on our farm.

There is a $500 stipend and as many vegetables as you can eat. The apprentice will be housed in our brand new yome (a dwelling that is a cross between a yurt and a geodesic dome). The yome is located on our farm and serves as the main living space. There is also an off-grid solar shower house/composting toilet. We are in the process of building an off-grid kitchen. This living area is a work in progress and our apprentice will be asked to help with the construction of this project. There are also on-site laundry facilities.

If you are interested in working with us, please email Jason Oatis at edible.earthscapes@gmail.com Please include a resume and let us know who you are and why you’d like to apprentice on our farm.

 

 

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Posted in Farm, Photos

Polyculture Fantastic!

We haven’t updated our blog with photos in awhile so we took a few to show what’s going on in the greenhouse in December. Lots of greens!We have 2 polyculture beds going this winter. One outside and one in the hoophouse. These beds have over 15 varieties of cool weather crops growing in them simultaneously. The seeds of the respective veggies were hand broadcast all together and covered lightly with soil on the same day. Soon there was a thick carpet of germinating greens and root vegetables covering the soil. This living mulch quickly outcompetes weeds and helps keep moisture in the soil, so it’s a very low-labor-intensive style of farming. It looks beautiful too!

 

A few weeks after sowing the seeds, we can begin harvesting the baby greens for delectable salads. By thinning the greens in this way, it makes space for select plants to grow bigger and reach full maturity. We are regularly thinning the polycultures so there is a constant supply of food, but we are careful to make sure that the soil is always covered by the lush vegetables.

Another advantage of polycultures is that they confuse the pests because the varieties are all mixed in with each other. A bug might find one plant he likes to munch on, but the plant next door is probably something totally different, so he’ll have a hard time finding all of the plants of that variety that he craves.

Spring and fall are the best times to start a polyculture, so now is a good time to start planning a spring polyculture in your garden. It doesn’t take much space to grow great polyculture!

Posted in Farm

2010 Apprenticeship Program

Working in the greenhouse

This year, we’re looking to expand our production acreage from 1 acre to 5 acres.  We’ll be developing a 2 acre perennial plot, a 1 acre rice padi field, and adding another acre of annual vegetables to the 1 acre we already have in production.  Currently we have 1 apprentice, Devin, living and working on site. He’s been with us since last September, and doing a fantastic job while learning various aspects of our farm’s day to day operations.  We’re hoping to find one more hard-working apprentice to work alongside Devin and help us with our expansion as well as our ongoing vegetable production, CSA and farmers’ market.

Continue reading “2010 Apprenticeship Program”

Posted in Farm

And so the Battle of the Bugs Begins…

Marigolds have a strong scent that ward off most pests and nematodes

Every Saturday, after a day at market, I look forward to the evening when I go out into the fields to soak in the beautiful sunset glow at the time of day when anything I do on the farm is pleasurable. This evening I had the intentions of weeding the burdock bed but I noticed the squash wasn’t looking so peppy. Sure enough the squash bugs had found them! I had just finished reading an article on squash and squash bugs in an older edition of Mother Earth News.

Continue reading “And so the Battle of the Bugs Begins…”

Posted in Farm, Photos

The Farm is Feelin’ Good…

Tomatoes getting ready to climb their bamboo trellis.  Eggplants are growing next to them under row covers to protect them from flea beatles.  The cucumber trellis rises up in the background with lettuce growing where it will be shaded by cukes.
Tomatoes getting ready to climb their bamboo trellis. Eggplants are growing next to them under row covers to protect them from flea beatles. The cucumber trellis rises up in the background with lettuce growing where it will be shaded by cukes.
This winter cover crop has matured into rows of scarlet beauty while fixing nitrogen in the soil for future crops.
Crimson Clover This winter cover crop has matured into rows of scarlet beauty while fixing nitrogen in the soil for future crops.
Lettuce, Napa cabbage, garlic, cauliflower, peas, carrots, turnips, beets, onions...not necessarily in that order.
Lettuce, Napa cabbage, garlic, cauliflower, peas, carrots, turnips, beets, onions...not necessarily in that order.
Haruka in the herb garden.
Haruka in the herb garden.
That one in the middle looks like some kinda weird animal skull of some sort... to me.
Butterhead Lettuce That one in the middle looks like some kinda weird animal skull of some sort.
Sunset on the farm.
Sunset on the farm.